Who shot Martin Luther King in 1968?

What happened to Dr Luther King Jr in 1968?

At 6:05 P.M. on Thursday, April 4, 1968, King was shot while standing on a balcony outside his second-floor room at the Lorraine Motel. One shot was heard coming from another location. King was rushed to a hospital and died an hour later. … President Lyndon Johnson ordered a national day of mourning on April 7.

Why did MLK turn around on the bridge?

On March 9 King led more than 2,000 individuals on a march to the bridge. Reluctant to violate the restraining order, however, he turned the procession around, after leading it in prayer, when state troopers ordered it to halt.

Who was on the balcony with King?

In a famous photo taken by Time magazine photographer Joseph Louw, Young is seen standing near Martin Luther King Jr.’s body on the balcony with Abernathy, Kyles, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and an 18-year-old Memphis State University student in bobby socks named Mary Louise Hunt.

How old would MLK be today?

Martin Luther King Jr. Were he alive today, nearly 47 years after his assassination in Memphis, Tennessee, he would be 86 years of age.

Who was killed in 1968?

On June 5, 1968, presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was mortally wounded shortly after midnight at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.

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What cities had riots in 1968?

1968 riots

  • 1968 Washington, D.C., riots, April 4–8, Washington, D.C.
  • 1968 Chicago riots (West Side Riots), April 5–7, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Baltimore riot of 1968, April 6–12, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • Avondale, Cincinnati#Riots of 1968, April 8, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 1968 Kansas City, Missouri riot, April 9, Kansas City, Missouri.

What happened after Martin Luther King gave his speech?

After this speech, the name Martin Luther King was known to many more people than before. It made Congress move faster in passing the Civil Rights Act. This set of laws was finally passed the next year, in 1964. Many of these laws gave African-Americans more equal treatment than they ever had before.