Best answer: Why were there protests against the Vietnam War?

Why did student protests against the Vietnam War turn violent?

At different times they chose different targets: the Pentagon, Presidents Nixon and Johnson, the draft, Dow Chemical. But the students all acted from a common belief that the Vietnam War was wrong. As that conflict escalated, the protests grew in strength, and some turned violent.

Who protested against the Vietnam War?

Anti-war marches and other protests, such as the ones organized by Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), attracted a widening base of support over the next three years, peaking in early 1968 after the successful Tet Offensive by North Vietnamese troops proved that war’s end was nowhere in sight.

What was the largest protest against the Vietnam War?

April 17, 1965 was the largest anti-war protest to have been held in Washington, D.C. up to that time. The number of marchers (15,000–25,000) was close to the number of U.S. soldiers in Vietnam at the time (less than 25,000).

Did America support the Vietnam War?

North Vietnam was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; South Vietnam was supported by the United States, South Korea, the Philippines, Australia, Thailand, and other anti-communist allies.

Was the Vietnam War a mistake?

For many who study foreign affairs, the Vietnam War was a tragic mistake brought about by U.S. leaders who exaggerated the influence of communism and underestimated the power of nationalism. … In this view, Vietnam was neither a crime, a forfeit nor a tragic mistake. It was a proxy conflict in the Cold War.

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Did protests end the Vietnam War?

Fred Halstead writes that it was “the first time [the anti-war movement] reached the level of a full-fledged mass movement.”

Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam
Goals Create peaceful mass action to end American involvement in the Vietnam War
Resulted in Richard Nixon’s “Silent majority” speech Growing protest movement